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#1 NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER  Brené Brown has taught us what it means to dare greatly, rise strong, and brave the wilderness. Now, based on new research conducted with leaders, change makers, and culture shifters, she’s showing us how to put those ideas into practice so we can step up and lead.

Look for Brené Brown’s new podcast, Dare to Lead, as well as her ongoing podcast Unlocking Us!

NAMED ONE OF THE BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR BY BLOOMBERG

Leadership is not about titles, status, and wielding power. A leader is anyone who takes responsibility for recognizing the potential in people and ideas, and has the courage to develop that potential.

When we dare to lead, we don’t pretend to have the right answers; we stay curious and ask the right questions. We don’t see power as finite and hoard it; we know that power becomes infinite when we share it with others. We don’t avoid difficult conversations and situations; we lean into vulnerability when it’s necessary to do good work.

But daring leadership in a culture defined by scarcity, fear, and uncertainty requires skill-building around traits that are deeply and uniquely human. The irony is that we’re choosing not to invest in developing the hearts and minds of leaders at the exact same time as we’re scrambling to figure out what we have to offer that machines and AI can’t do better and faster. What can we do better? Empathy, connection, and courage, to start.

Four-time #1 New York Times bestselling author Brené Brown has spent the past two decades studying the emotions and experiences that give meaning to our lives, and the past seven years working with transformative leaders and teams spanning the globe. She found that leaders in organizations ranging from small entrepreneurial startups and family-owned businesses to nonprofits, civic organizations, and Fortune 50 companies all ask the same question: 

How do you cultivate braver, more daring leaders, and how do you embed the value of courage in your culture? 

In this new book, Brown uses research, stories, and examples to answer these questions in the no-BS style that millions of readers have come to expect and love.

Brown writes, “One of the most important findings of my career is that daring leadership is a collection of four skill sets that are 100 percent teachable, observable, and measurable. It’s learning and unlearning that requires brave work, tough conversations, and showing up with your whole heart. Easy? No. Because choosing courage over comfort is not always our default. Worth it? Always. We want to be brave with our lives and our work. It’s why we’re here.”

Whether you’ve read Daring Greatly and Rising Strong or you’re new to Brené Brown’s work, this book is for anyone who wants to step up and into brave leadership.

Review

“With Dare to Lead, Brené brings decades of research to bear in a practical and insightful guide to courageous leadership. This book is a road map for anyone who wants to lead mindfully, live bravely, and dare to lead.” —Sheryl Sandberg, COO, Facebook, founder, LeanIn.Org and OptionB.Org

“Brené visited Pixar to talk with our filmmakers. Her message was important, as movies are best when they come from a place of vulnerability, when the people who make them encounter setbacks and are forced to overcome them, when they are willing to have their asses handed to them. It is easy to sit back and talk about the values of a safe and meaningful culture, but extraordinarily difficult to pull it off. You don’t achieve good culture without constant attention, without an environment of safety, courage, and vulnerability. These are hard skills, but they are teachable skills. Start with this book.” —Ed Catmull, president, Pixar and Walt Disney Animation Studios

“Whether you’re leading a movement or a start-up, if you’re trying to change an organizational culture or the world, Dare to Lead will challenge everything you think you know about brave leadership and give you honest, straightforward, actionable tools for choosing courage over comfort.” —Tarana Burke, senior director, Girls for Gender Equity, founder, the Me Too movement

“We asked Brené to bring her work on courage and vulnerability to our Air Force base. This is a tough audience, many of them with significant combat experience. Within five minutes, you could have heard a pin drop. Brené cuts through the noise and speaks to what makes us human and makes the mission happen. Dare to Lead is about real leadership: tenacious, from the heart, and full of grit.” —Brigadier General Brook J. Leonard, United States Air Force

“Brené is Google Empathy Lab’s Obi-Wan Kenobi. She has profoundly inspired our product leaders to design in and embrace vulnerability, rather than engineer it out. It’s a critical and transformative act to bring your alive, messy, wholehearted human self to work every day. Dare to Lead is the skillful and empowering Jedi training we have all been waiting for.” —Danielle Krettek, founder, Google Empathy Lab

“Applying the principles from Dare to Lead to my work as a principal has transformed the way I show up with parents, students, and colleagues, and how I lead. Brené’s words, stories, and examples connect with our hearts and minds, and her actionable approach gives us the tools to be braver with our lives and our work.” —Kwabena Mensah, PhD, assistant superintendent, Fort Bend ISD, Principal of the Year, Katy ISD and Texas Alliance of Black School Educators

“Brené truly gives it all away in  Dare to Lead. Courage is a set of teachable skills, and she teaches us exactly how to build those muscles with research, stories, examples, and new language. The future belongs to brave leaders, and she’s written the ultimate playbook for daring leadership.” —Scott Harrison, founder and CEO, charity: water

About the Author

Brené Brown is a research professor at the University of Houston, where she holds the Huffington Foundation–Brené Brown Endowed Chair at the Graduate College of Social Work. She is also a visiting professor in management at the University of Texas at Austin’s McCombs School of Business. Brown has spent the past two decades studying courage, vulnerability, shame, and empathy and is the author of five #1  New York Times bestsellers:  The Gifts of ImperfectionDaring GreatlyRising StrongBraving the Wilderness, and  Dare to Lead, which is the culmination of a seven-year study on courage and leadership. With Tarana Burke, she co-edited the bestselling anthology  You Are Your Best Thing: Vulnerability, Shame Resilience, and the Black Experience. She hosts the  Unlocking Us and  Dare to Lead podcasts, and her TEDx talk, “The Power of Vulnerability,” is one of the top five most-viewed TED talks in the world with more than 50 million views. Her Netflix special,  The Call to Courage, is the first filmed lecture by a researcher on the streaming service. Brené Brown lives in Houston, Texas, with her husband, Steve. They have two children, Ellen and Charlie.

Excerpt. © Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved.

section one

The Moment and the Myths

the moment the universe put the Roosevelt quote in front of me, three lessons came into sharp focus. The first one is what I call “the physics of vulnerability.” It’s pretty simple: If we are brave enough often enough, we will fall. Daring is not saying “I’m willing to risk failure.” Daring is saying “I know I will eventually fail, and I’m still all in.” I’ve never met a brave person who hasn’t known disappointment, failure, even heartbreak.

Second, the Roosevelt quote captures everything I’ve learned about vulnerability. The definition of vulnerability as the emotion that we experience during times of uncertainty, risk, and emotional exposure first emerged in my work two decades ago, and has been validated by every study I’ve done since, including this research on leadership. Vulnerability is not winning or losing. It’s having the courage to show up when you can’t control the outcome.

We’ve asked thousands of people to describe vulnerability to us over the years, and these are a few of the answers that directly pierce the emotion: the first date after my divorce, talking about race with my team, trying to get pregnant after my second miscarriage, starting my own business, watching my child leave for college, apologizing to a colleague about how I spoke to him in a meeting, sending my son to orchestra practice knowing how badly he wants to make first chair and knowing there’s a really good chance he will not make the orchestra at all, waiting for the doctor to call back, giving feedback, getting feedback, getting fired, firing someone.

Across all of our data there’s not a shred of empirical evidence that vulnerability is weakness.

Are vulnerable experiences easy? No.

Can they make us feel anxious and uncertain? Yes.

Do they make us want to self-protect? Always.

Does showing up for these experiences with a whole heart and no armor require courage? Absolutely.

The third thing I learned has turned into a mandate by which I live: If you are not in the arena getting your ass kicked on occasion, I’m not interested in or open to your feedback. There are a million cheap seats in the world today filled with people who will never be brave with their lives but who will spend every ounce of energy they have hurling advice and judgment at those who dare greatly. Their only contributions are criticism, cynicism, and fearmongering. If you’re criticizing from a place where you’re not also putting yourself on the line, I’m not interested in what you have to say.

We have to avoid the cheap-seats feedback and stay armor-free. The research participants who do both of those well have one hack in common: Get clear on whose opinions of you matter.

We need to seek feedback from those people. And even if it’s really hard to hear, we must bring it in and hold it until we learn from it. This is what the research taught me:

Don’t grab hurtful comments and pull them close to you by rereading them and ruminating on them. Don’t play with them by rehearsing your badass comeback. And whatever you do, don’t pull hatefulness close to your heart.

Let what’s unproductive and hurtful drop at the feet of your unarmored self. And no matter how much your self-doubt wants to scoop up the criticism and snuggle with the negativity so it can confirm its worst fears, or how eager the shame gremlins are to use the hurt to fortify your armor, take a deep breath and find the strength to leave what’s mean-spirited on the ground. You don’t even need to stomp it or kick it away. Cruelty is cheap, easy, and chickenshit. It doesn’t deserve your energy or engagement. Just step over the comments and keep daring, always remembering that armor is too heavy a price to pay to engage with cheap-seat feedback.

Again, if we shield ourselves from all feedback, we stop growing. If we engage with all feedback, regardless of the quality and intention, it hurts too much, and we will ultimately armor up by pretending it doesn’t hurt, or, worse yet, we’ll disconnect from vulnerability and emotion so fully that we stop feeling hurt. When we get to the place that the armor is so thick that we no longer feel anything, we experience a real death. We’ve paid for self-protection by sealing off our heart from everyone, and from everything—not just hurt, but love.

No one captures the consequences of choosing that level of self-protection over love better than C. S. Lewis:

To love at all is to be vulnerable. Love anything, and your heart will certainly be wrung and possibly be broken. If you want to make sure of keeping it intact, you must give your heart to no one, not even to an animal. Wrap it carefully round with hobbies and little luxuries; avoid all entanglements; lock it up safe in the casket or coffin of your selfishness. But in that casket—safe, dark, motionless, airless—it will change. It will not be broken; it will become unbreakable, impenetrable, irredeemable.

To love is to be vulnerable.

Rumble Tool: The Square Squad

When we define ourselves by what everyone thinks, it’s hard to be brave. When we stop caring about what anyone thinks, we’re too armored for authentic connection. So how do we get clear on whose opinions of us matter?

Here’s the solution we shared in Daring Greatly: Get a one-inch by one-inch piece of paper and write down the names of the people whose opinions of you matter. It needs to be small because it forces you to edit. Fold it and put it in your wallet. Then take ten minutes to reach out to those people—your square squad—and share a little gratitude. You can keep it simple: I’m getting clear on whose opinions matter to me. Thank you for being one of those people. I’m grateful that you care enough to be honest and real with me.

If you need a rubric for choosing the people, here’s the best I have: The people on your list should be the people who love you not despite your vulnerability and imperfections, but because of them.

The people on your list should not be “yes” people. This is not the suck-up squad. They should be people who respect you enough to rumble with the vulnerability of saying “I think you were out of your integrity in that situation, and you need to clean it up and apologize. I’ll be here to support you through that.” Or “Yes, that was a huge setback, but you were brave and I’ll dust you off and cheer you on when you go back into the arena.”

The Four Six Myths of Vulnerability

In Daring Greatly, I wrote about four myths surrounding vulnerability, but since I’ve brought the courage-building work into organizations and have been doing it with leaders, the data have spoken, and there are clearly six misguided myths that persist across wide variables including gender, age, race, country, ability and culture.

Myth #1: Vulnerability is weakness.

It used to take me a long time to dispel the myths that surround vulnerability, especially the myth that vulnerability is weakness. But in 2014, standing across from several hundred military special forces soldiers on a base in the Midwest, I decided to stop evangelizing, and I nailed my argument with a single question.

I looked at these brave soldiers and said, “Vulnerability is the emotion that we experience during times of uncertainty, risk, and emotional exposure. Can you give me a single example of courage that you’ve witnessed in another soldier or experienced in your own life that did not require experiencing vulnerability?”

Complete silence. Crickets.

Finally, a young man spoke up. He said, “No, ma’am. Three tours. I can’t think of a single act of courage that doesn’t require managing massive vulnerability.”

I’ve asked that question now a couple of hundred times in meeting rooms across the globe. I’ve asked fighter pilots and software engineers, teachers and accountants, CIA agents and CEOs, clergy and professional athletes, artists and activists, and not one person has been able to give me an example of courage without vulnerability. The weakness myth simply crumbles under the weight of the data and people’s lived experiences of courage.

Myth #2: I don’t do vulnerability.

Our daily lives are defined by experiences of uncertainty, risk, and emotional exposure. There is no opting out, but there are two options: You can do vulnerability, or it can do you. Choosing to own our vulnerability and do it consciously means learning how to rumble with this emotion and understand how it drives our thinking and behavior so we can stay aligned with our values and live in our integrity. Pretending that we don’t do vulnerability means letting fear drive our thinking and behavior without our input or even awareness, which almost always leads to acting out or shutting down.

If you don’t believe the data, ask someone from your square squad this question: How do I act when I’m feeling vulnerable? If you’re rumbling with vulnerability from a place of awareness, you won’t hear anything you don’t know and that you aren’t actively addressing. If you subscribe to the idea of terminal uniqueness (everyone in the world but you), you will probably be on the receiving end of some tough feedback.

And as much as we’d like to believe that wisdom and experience can replace the need to “do” vulnerability, they don’t. If anything, wisdom and experience validate the importance of rumbling with vulnerability. I love this quote by Madeleine L’Engle: “When we were children, we used to think that when we were grown-up we would no longer be vulnerable. But to grow up is to accept vulnerability.”

Myth #3: I can go it alone.

The third myth surrounding vulnerability is “I can go it alone.” One line of defense that I encounter is “I don’t need to be vulnerable because I don’t need anyone.” I’m with you. Some days I wish it were true. The problem, however, is that needing no one pushes against everything we know about human neurobiology. We are hardwired for connection. From our mirror neurons to language, we are a social species. In the absence of authentic connection, we suffer. And by authentic I mean the kind of connection that doesn’t require hustling for acceptance and changing who we are to fit in.

I dug deep into the work of the neuroscience researcher John Cacioppo when I was writing Braving the Wilderness. He dedicated his career to understanding loneliness, belonging, and connection, and he makes the argument that we don’t derive strength from our rugged individualism, but rather from our collective ability to plan, communicate, and work together. Our neural, hormonal, and genetic makeup support interdependence over independence. He explained, “To grow to adulthood as a social species, including humans, is not to become autonomous and solitary, it’s to become the one on whom others can depend. Whether we know it or not, our brain and biology have been shaped to favor this outcome.” No matter how much we love Whitesnake—and, as many of you know, I do—we really weren’t born to walk alone.

Myth #4: You can engineer the uncertainty and discomfort out of vulnerability.

I love working with tech companies and engineers. There is almost always a moment when someone suggests that we should make vulnerability easier by engineering the uncertainty and emotion right out of it. I’ve had people recommend everything from a texting app for hard conversations to an algorithm to predict when it’s safe to be vulnerable with someone.

As I mentioned in the introduction, what sometimes underpins this urge is how we think about vulnerability and the way we use the word. Many people walk into work every day with one clear task: Engineer the vulnerability and uncertainty out of systems and/or mitigate risk. This is true of everyone from lawyers, who often equate vulnerability with loopholes and liabilities, to engineers and other people who work in operations, security, and technology, who think of vulnerabilities as potential systems failures, to combat soldiers and surgeons, who may literally equate vulnerabilities with death.

When I start talking about engaging with vulnerability and even embracing it, there can be real resistance until I clarify that I’m talking about relational vulnerability, not systemic vulnerability. Several years ago, I was working with a group of rocket scientists (actual ones). During a break an engineer walked up to me and said, “I don’t do vulnerability. I can’t. And that’s a good thing. If I get all vulnerable, shit might fall from the sky. Literally.”

I smiled and said, “Tell me about the toughest part of your job. Is it keeping shit from falling from the sky?”

He said, “No. We’ve created sophisticated systems that control for human error. It’s hard work, but not the part I hate the most.”

Wait for it.

He thought for a minute and said, “It’s leading the team and all the people stuff. I’ve got a guy who is just not a good fit. His deliverables have been off for a year. I’ve tried everything. I got really tough this last time, but he almost started crying, so I wrapped up the meeting. It just didn’t feel right. But now it’s like I’m going to get in trouble because I’m not even turning in his performance sheets.”

I said, “Yeah. That sounds hard. How does it feel?”

His response: “Got it. I’ll sit down now.”

Those fields in which systemic vulnerability is equated with failure (or worse) are often the ones in which I see people struggling the most for daring leadership skills and, interestingly, the ones in which people, once they understand, are willing to really dig deep and rumble hard. Can you imagine how hard it can be to wrap your brain around the critical role vulnerability plays in leadership when you’re rewarded for eliminating vulnerability every day?

Another example of this comes from Canary Wharf—London’s financial district—where I spent an afternoon with some very proper bankers who wondered what I was doing there and weren’t afraid to ask me directly. They explained that banking is completely compliance driven and there’s no place for vulnerability. Neither the frustrated bankers nor the wonderful and forward-thinking learning and development team who invited me expected my answer.

I was honest: “Tomorrow is my last day in London, and I ­really want to visit James Smith & Sons”—the famous umbrella shop that’s been around since the early 1800s—“so let’s try to figure out why I’m here, and if we can’t, I’m out.”

They seemed a little miffed but interested in the deal. So I asked one question: “What’s the biggest issue you’re facing here and in your industry?”

There was a pause filled with some back-and-forth between people before the self-elected spokesperson shouted out “Ethical decision making.”

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📚 Bookwyrm 📚
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Not just for work! Wish I had this book years ago, it would have
Reviewed in the United States on October 9, 2018
saved me grief and kept me from causing others grief. Dare to Lead is for everyone, not just professional leaders, because everything in this book applies to families and other groups. As Brené states, “I define a leader as anyone who takes responsibility for finding the... See more
saved me grief and kept me from causing others grief. Dare to Lead is for everyone, not just professional leaders, because everything in this book applies to families and other groups. As Brené states, “I define a leader as anyone who takes responsibility for finding the potential in people and processes, and who has the courage to develop that potential.” In fact, Dare to Lead would be a wonderful resource or curriculum for a required high school class. There is SO much incredible insight, wisdom, and advice that my brain is tired, and it’s been havoc on my tear ducts multiple times.

We all belong to groups, whether it’s at work, in social and community groups or clubs, etc., as members or leaders. And while this book is primarily aimed at leaders in the workplace, any group member would benefit from this knowledge and advice. Over the years, my groups have included my family of origin, my family from marriage, educational groups, event groups, competitive groups, etc. I have always been a good worker, boss, teacher, and leader of different groups. But “good” leaves a lot of leeway for the fact that a few times I have really screwed up in the very ways that Brené discusses. I look back and there were times that my perfectionism, my black-and-white rule-following, and my tendency to sometimes rush to judgement really hurt people. Not to mention, my shame affected my leadership.

As I read Dare to Lead, I kept flashing to situations in my past and a couple of people I would really like to go back apologize to, one lady in particular. (Well, really, I want to travel back in time and not screw up to begin with, but sadly that’s just a fantasy.) A bit of background: I was raised in a very abusive family, physically and emotionally. My family of origin’s modus operandi was to judge, criticize, and belittle each member constantly. Mistakes and weaknesses were never forgiven, but held up, mocked, and laughed about over and over, on top of physical and emotional abuse.

Armed with self-help books (yes, my family mocks my reliance on self-help books) and therapy, I determined to leave all that behind and become a “normal” person very different from my parents. But sometimes that background messes with my current life. (As Brené says: “What’s perhaps most insidious in power over dynamics is that those who are powerless typically repeat the same behavior when the tables are turned and they are promoted into power.” I would add, sometimes against our best intentions.)

There was a time that my insecurity in running a large group led me to take a friend’s reported actions as betrayal. The resulting emotional backlash caused me to handle the situation so badly that I ended up being judgmental and majorly unkind to my friend to such a degree that the title “friend” no longer applies. I should have known better; I should have acted better. It wasn’t just that I hurt my reputation, interfered with how well the group was functioning, looked unprofessional to a hosting facility… The absolutely worst part was that I hurt another person - an innocent person. I broke every tenet I had set for my life because I didn’t take the time to step back and to be a good leader; I just reacted. I went right into shame and blame because I had such an inner fear of being disrespected and betrayed. As a consequence, I disrespected and betrayed my friend by treating her unkindly.

In addition, I almost shut down a service that was helping over 1,000 families over the incident. I let fear rule my actions (“I don’t do vulnerability”) and cut my helpers loose (“I can go it alone”). I curtailed offerings and cancelled events. I had listened to and internalized comments from critics as they touched upon the worthlessness instilled by my parents and siblings. (Many people are eager to criticize, and it takes wisdom and practice to let go of unhelpful criticism and use the helpful input for growth.) My actions influenced some members to take sides in a group that shouldn’t have had “sides.” (“Increased polarization, rampant dehumanization of people who are different from us, and our growing inability to ditch the echo chambers for real critical thinking.”) After working alone for another year or so, I handed off the group to a team of ladies that I knew would do a better job than I was doing.

I believe if I had read Dare to Lead first, I would have had the tools in place to respond appropriately in a way that would have fostered group cohesion, eliminated problems, and just generally been a better leader for my group. In addition, I ponder Brené’s adage that the “courage to be vulnerable is not about winning or losing, it’s about the courage to show up when you can’t predict or control the outcome.” I’ve considered going back and apologizing to my ex-friend many times, but I’ve always been afraid that it would simply set off more negativity. But it was my lack of judgement and responding with emotions from my past that caused the rift, and I’d like her to know that I take full responsibility for that. Is it too late to go back and tell this person how badly I feel about being a leader who truly mishandled the situation? Would it make a difference to her?

I plan to reread this life-changing book with my husband and daughter, both IT professionals, so they can learn from it while I benefit from the review. Dare to Lead contains wisdom to guide leaders who want to nurture safe and effective work groups. It can also benefit leaders and members of any other groups or teams, whether for a sport, church, political group, competitive team, etc. Dare to Lead would also be a great resource for members to use to kindly hold leaders accountable. There is no downside to taking this entire book in as heart knowledge and incorporating it into our lives. And the upside is that we will not only improve the quality of our own lives, but the lives of those we interact with.

Highly recommended for the universe at large. This is the first book I’ve read by Brené Brown; I’ll definitely be reading more!

Edited for clarity.
310 people found this helpful
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Hendrie Weisinger
1.0 out of 5 stars
same old stuff
Reviewed in the United States on October 19, 2018
If you have read her other books, there is no need to read this one. It is more of the same but slanted to the business audience around leadership. One of the most useless leadership book I have ever read. I note the first quote is from Sheryl Sandberg--I would bet she... See more
If you have read her other books, there is no need to read this one. It is more of the same but slanted to the business audience around leadership. One of the most useless leadership book I have ever read. I note the first quote is from Sheryl Sandberg--I would bet she never read the book, just gave a quote. The book is well written and some decent stories but no different than any other business book that is filled with stories of different leaders. I would say this book will be liked by her fans, others will find it a waste.
233 people found this helpful
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Karen
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Love Brene, but loved her other books more
Reviewed in the United States on November 13, 2018
I have loved Brene''s previous books. She is a great writer and I appreciate how well rounded her ideas are. They are applicable in so many avenues of life. While I understand this book was about "daring" to lead, I was disappointed that this book had a narrow... See more
I have loved Brene''s previous books. She is a great writer and I appreciate how well rounded her ideas are. They are applicable in so many avenues of life.

While I understand this book was about "daring" to lead, I was disappointed that this book had a narrow scope of management in slower paced environments (I work in a tech company - extending timelines, circling back, etc. are not luxuries I can use in my day to day). Additionally, I hoped this was going to focus on leading and not direct management, as leading comes in so many forms and not always in formal direct ways. Lastly, many of the ideas and stories shared were reused from other books and shaped into the theme of leadership.
122 people found this helpful
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Annette Mason
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A True Path to Wholehearted Living - Brene walks you through the steps on how to Rumble
Reviewed in the United States on October 21, 2018
Recommend that you dog-ear pages 70, 76, and 77. Brene Brown excels once again and goes further with her research and writing to describe behaviors and emotions that we''ve all felt. More importantly, she gives us constructive actions we can take to live and work more... See more
Recommend that you dog-ear pages 70, 76, and 77. Brene Brown excels once again and goes further with her research and writing to describe behaviors and emotions that we''ve all felt. More importantly, she gives us constructive actions we can take to live and work more effectively and wholeheartedly.

Page 70 sums up the journey her book will take you on should you chose to go. It reads, "Leaders must either invest a reasonable amount of time attending to fears and feelings, or squander an unreasonable amount of time trying to manage ineffective and unproductive behavior."

Pages 76 and 77 give you sixteen specific examples of Armored Leadership and Daring Leadership. You''ll recognize them immediately. And you will be able to call out the behaviors that are holding you back or propelling you forward. On subsequent pages she unpacks the examples so that we can put the words to work for ourselves and our colleagues.
129 people found this helpful
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Linda Graebner
1.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
What a disappointment!
Reviewed in the United States on December 1, 2018
I''ve followed Brene for years and love her work. But this book is a "stream of consciousness" walk through her past work. I was waiting for a new insight but found none after 275 pages. I''d love to get new insights in a more "crisp" format with some "takeaway" value.
119 people found this helpful
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Laurence Kirshbaum
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
How to be a Brene counter and not a Bean counter
Reviewed in the United States on October 30, 2018
This is a spectacular excursion into humane but effective leadership. In her brief bio, it states that Brene Brown has "spent past two decades studying courage, vulnerability, shame and empathy." Those are not the typical descriptions of bestselling business... See more
This is a spectacular excursion into humane but effective leadership. In her brief bio, it states that Brene Brown has "spent past two decades studying courage, vulnerability, shame and empathy." Those are not the typical descriptions of bestselling business characteristics. In fact, this book could really be sub-titled,"How to be a better human being and apply your new ''muscles'' to the business of leadership." What''s fascinating is that the author calls herself a "research professor" with a social work doctorate, and her research has been extensive and varied, from military leaders to teachers. In this regard she has adopted the data-based techniques of Jim Collins, whose "Good to Great" has been the gold standard for many years. But her message is different in that it does not recommend "engineering" innovation, but rather relying on "rumbling with vulnerability," "living into one''s values," and having the courage to make decisions even where the outcome may be uncomfortable and possibly a failure. Her idea that uncertainty can lead to the positive result of "unpredictable and uncontrollable connections" is applicable to parents and students and care-givers and workers of all stripes as well as c-suite leaders. Anyone who wants to take control of his or her life and understand the role of humility in human relationships will want to read this book. As she points out, it takes about the same length of time to read as a flight from Los Angeles to New York "with a small delay." Very much worth the time.
61 people found this helpful
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Ircel Harrison
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Read This Book!
Reviewed in the United States on December 3, 2018
If you are a leader or aspire to be one, this book will speak to you on a very emotional level, particularly her chapter on “Armored Leadership.” As I read the sixteen examples of armored leadership and the contrasting daring leadership actions, I found myself evaluating my... See more
If you are a leader or aspire to be one, this book will speak to you on a very emotional level, particularly her chapter on “Armored Leadership.” As I read the sixteen examples of armored leadership and the contrasting daring leadership actions, I found myself evaluating my own experiences as a leader. There were points where I could say, “Yes, I nailed that one!” but too many times where my response was, “Yeah, I failed to realize what I was doing and fell right into the trap.”

Her chapter on “Living into Your Values,” validates my conviction that values are at the very center of what we do as leaders. If we do not identify and act on our values, we will fail. Brown writes, “Daring leaders who live into their values are never silent about the hard things.” Living into our values means more than articulating our values; it means that we practice them. She explains that individuals do not have two sets of values--one personal and one professional. We have only one set of values that we are called to practice in all areas of our lives.

This is a great book. Whatever your position is, whatever your responsibilities, please read this book and put its lessons into practice.
52 people found this helpful
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Becky C.
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
An Inspired Way to be a Leader!
Reviewed in the United States on October 30, 2018
I love Brene Brown''s books, but this one really put it all together. If we could lead from this place that she describes in this book, then we can change the world. And these are not just thoughts and ideas, but proven things that she has researched for many years! She... See more
I love Brene Brown''s books, but this one really put it all together. If we could lead from this place that she describes in this book, then we can change the world. And these are not just thoughts and ideas, but proven things that she has researched for many years! She provides great thoughts and suggestions here so that leaders can really take this research and put it into practice. I''m going to start practicing it myself and incorporate methods into my own life so that I can affect positive changes all around me. We all can make a greater impact than we realize. And you don''t have to be a "leader" as far as managing large groups of people. We are all leaders and can affect change with anyone we come into contact.
31 people found this helpful
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Top reviews from other countries

Antony Simpson
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Essential Reading for Any Leader (Review from: AntonySimpson.com)
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on July 9, 2019
I first discovered Brené Brown when I saw her TED talk titled The Power of Vulnerability. Which Brown followed up with a TED Talk, Listening to Shame. So when I started on a leadership course at work, I decided to buy Dare To Lead by Brené Brown. Dare To Lead is about...See more
I first discovered Brené Brown when I saw her TED talk titled The Power of Vulnerability. Which Brown followed up with a TED Talk, Listening to Shame. So when I started on a leadership course at work, I decided to buy Dare To Lead by Brené Brown. Dare To Lead is about leadership that is vulnerable, values-based, trusting and resilient. The book is split into four parts. The first and biggest part is Rumbling with Vulnerability. In this section Brown discusses what vulnerability is, why it is important, myths about vulnerability, using courage to drop our armor as leaders, dealing with shame and empathy and curiosity grounded in confidence. The second part is Living Into Our Values. Values are very important to me, so unsurprisingly this was my favorite part of the book. This section covers what our own values are, what organisational values can be and how to turn values into measurable behaviours. The List of Values activity I completed with some of my colleagues at work and I found it an incredibly useful in terms of learning more about them and what they value. Since I have also contributed to a consultation at work around our organisational values. The third part of the book is Braving Trust. This section of the book is all about building trust as a leader and recognising how trust is built up gradually over time and can be easily lost. The fourth part of the book is Learning to Rise which is all about resilience. This part of the book is about recognising emotion within ourselves and others as a leader, being curious about emotions and being self-aware enough to recognise what is going on emotionally for ourselves and others. Throughout Dare To Lead are many helpful strategies that if implemented would make you a better leader. Including strategies around: having difficult conversations, increasing self-awareness, being aware of the values of ourselves and of the people we lead, being aware of the stories we tell ourselves (that may or may not be true), how to build trust and courage in the people that you lead. Dare To Lead is written in a way that feels like you’re having a conversation with Brown. She gives examples from her own experience and also asks open questions styled in a coaching method to encourage the reader to think about how these experiences relate to their own life. About Brené Brown Brené Brown is a Research Professor at the University of Huston, is a Social Worker and delivers talks and training on leadership around innovation, creativity and change. Brown has worked with Pixar (Disney) and Facebook around leadership. Dare To Lead by Brené Brown is available to buy on Amazon. Review soon, Antony
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Elizabeth D.
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
There is a world outside the USA
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on January 29, 2019
It is a good book and it improves as you go through it. However, the author, who is a professor, ought to realise that the use of gutter language, which might be acceptable in the USA, does not enhance her book and limits the book''s saleability in other markets. For someone...See more
It is a good book and it improves as you go through it. However, the author, who is a professor, ought to realise that the use of gutter language, which might be acceptable in the USA, does not enhance her book and limits the book''s saleability in other markets. For someone of her level, it is disappointing in that respect.
29 people found this helpful
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Mrs Y J Murray
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Daring, Courageous Leadership book that every leader should carefully consider
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on October 27, 2018
I found this book the most powerful of all the Brene Brown books I have read. It highlighted the amazing opportunity we all have to create joy and fairness in our workspaces and our relationships. Brené’s words in the last chapter. ‘The Revolution - I am not afraid of the...See more
I found this book the most powerful of all the Brene Brown books I have read. It highlighted the amazing opportunity we all have to create joy and fairness in our workspaces and our relationships. Brené’s words in the last chapter. ‘The Revolution - I am not afraid of the word revolution. I am afraid of a world that’s becoming less courageous and authentic.’ ‘Own the story and you get to write the ending. Deny the story and it owns you.’ I am certainly going to try as hard as I can to own mine. It’s our one shot. Thanks Brené for having the courage to share and lead the way.
20 people found this helpful
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Mike D
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Showing up when you can''t control the outcome
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on January 10, 2019
Brene''s research has led her to some very helpful insights about leadership, courage and vulnerability. There are some gems in this book although there is a bit too much recipe type solutions for my liking (hence 4 rather 5 stars). Many of her readers want simple to follow...See more
Brene''s research has led her to some very helpful insights about leadership, courage and vulnerability. There are some gems in this book although there is a bit too much recipe type solutions for my liking (hence 4 rather 5 stars). Many of her readers want simple to follow actions to implement the ideas; my view is that courage in leadership is a mindset rather than a list of actions/ behaviours.
13 people found this helpful
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Miss E K West
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A must read for managers!
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on December 8, 2018
The best Brene book I''ve read. Packed full with practical wisdom that you can start applying to your life and team straight away. This is a book for anyone that wants to become a better friend, colleague and manager. The best book on leadership and influencing culture that...See more
The best Brene book I''ve read. Packed full with practical wisdom that you can start applying to your life and team straight away. This is a book for anyone that wants to become a better friend, colleague and manager. The best book on leadership and influencing culture that I''ve read. One of the few books I''ve read that I want to buy multiple copies to give away to others!
11 people found this helpful
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Dare to Lead: Brave Work. Tough Conversations. Whole Hearts.




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